Michael Keaton Replaces Hugh Laurie in "RoboCop" Remake 


Goodbye Hugh Laurie, hello Michael Keaton. The actor is set to play the role of Raymond Sellars in the upcoming "RoboCop" remake from MGM/Columbia Pictures. According to Deadline, Sellars is the CEO of the corporation that builds RoboCop. The remake of the 1987 Paul Verhoeven film (yes, Hollywood is in a Verhoeven remake kick lately, with "Total Recall" being the first) is set to begin production next month. "RoboCop" will protect theaters on August 9, 2013.

Keaton will be joining Joel Kinnaman, Gary Oldman, Samuel L. Jackson, and Abbie Cornish. Jose Padilha, who is set to direct the film says, "Michael is the final addition to the amazing cast we have assembled for this film and it is so great to have the last puzzle piece in place. It is thrilling that everything has come together to bring this innovative new vision of RoboCop to life. We’ve got a great script, a great cast, some killer ED-209’s and I can’t wait to get Alex Murphy back on the streets."

We shall see if this "RoboCop" is ultimately superior to the original.

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Welcome to "Bates Motel!" Vera Farmiga to Play Mommy Bates in "Psycho" Prequel! 


So A&E is creating a "Psycho" prequel series called "Bates Motel" and it will examine the twisted relationship between Norman Bates and his mommy, Norma. As you may know, this angle was explored in "Psycho IV" where Olivia Hussey starred as the mommy of the serial killer played by Henry Thomas.

Now, Vera Farmiga ("Up in the Air") has been tapped to star as Norma Louis Bates. According to Deadline, the character is described as "passionate, and compelling, a smart, multidimensional character who is always capable of surprising us."

The 10-episode series will premiere on the cable network in 2013. Carlton Cuse ("Lost") and Kerry Ehrin ("Parenthood") will serve as the writers-executive producers.

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Tony Scott's Family Sets Up AFI Scholarship 


The family of director Tony Scott has created the tony Scott Scholarship Fund at the American Film Institute to honor the life and work of the filmmaker. Instead of flowers, Scott's family is asking for donations to be made to the fund to "help encourage and engage future generations of filmmakers."

Awww....

Contributions to the Tony Scott Scholarship Fund may be sent to:

American Film Institute

Tony Scott Scholarship Fund

2021 North Western Avenue

Los Angeles, CA 90027


Source: Deadline

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Directors Choose Best Films Ever! Tarantino, Scorsese Make Their Picks! 


During the first week of August, Sight & Sound organized a poll that dethroned "Citizen Kane" as the best movie ever made. Alfred Hitchcock's "Vertigo" took the title as the Greatest Film ending "Citizen Kane's" long run. (See Dethroned! "Citizen Kane" No Longer Best Movie Ever! Critics, Directors Pick Top 10 Films of All Time!)

Academians, archivists, critics, directors, and distributors all over the world were among the ones invited to participate in the poll. Now, Sight & Sound has revealed the choices made by our favorite directors (via Collider). Here they are (it's interesting to note that among the list of directors below, only Martin Scorsese, David O'Russell, and Sam Mendes picked "Vertigo"):

Andrew Dominik (The Assassination of Jesse James, Killing Them Softly)

Apocalypse Now (1979) – Francis Ford Coppola
Badlands (1973) – Terrence Malick
Barry Lyndon (1975) – Stanley Kubrick
Blue Velvet (1986) – David Lynch
Marnie (1964) – Alfred Hitchcock
Mulholland Dr. (2003) – David Lynch
The Night of the Hunter (1955) – Charles Laughton
Raging Bull (1980) – Martin Scorsese
Sunset Blvd. (1950) – Billy Wilder
The Tenant (1976) – Roman Polanski

Bong Joon-ho (The Host, Snow Piercer)

A City of Sadness (1989) – Hsiao-bsein Hou
Cure (1998) – Kurosawa Kiyoshi
Fargo (1995) – Joel & Ethan Coen
The Housemaid (1960) – Kim Ki-young
Psycho (1960) – Alfred Hitchcock
Raging Bull (1980) – Martin Scorsese
Touch of Evil (1958) – Orson Welles
Vengeance is Mine (1979) – Imamura Shohei
The Wages of Fear (1953) – Henri-Georges Clouzot
Zodiac (2007) – David Fincher

David O’Russell (The Fighter, I Heart Huckabees)

Blue Velvet (1986) – David Lynch
Chinatown (1974) – Roman Polanski
The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie (1972) – Luis Bunel
The Godfather (1972) – Francis Ford Coppola
Goodfellas (1990) – Martin Scorsese
It’s a Wonderful Life (1947) – Frank Capra
Pulp Fiction (1994) – Quentin Tarantino
Raging Bull (1980) – Martin Scorsese
Vertigo (1958) – Alfred Hitchcock
Young Frankenstein (1974) – Mel Brooks

Edgar Wright (Shaun of the Dead, Scott Pilgrim vs. The World)

2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) – Stanley Kubrick
An American Werewolf in London (1981) – John Landis
Carrie (1976) – Brian de Palma
Dames (1934) – Busby Berkeley
Don’t Look Now (1973) – Nicolas Roeg
Duck Soup (1933) – Leo McCarey
Psycho (1960) – Alfred Hitchcock
Raising Arizona (1987) – Joel & Ethan Coen
Taxi Driver (1976) – Martin Scorsese
The Wild Bunch (1969) – Sam Peckinpah

Francis Ford Coppola (The Godfather, The Conversation)

The Apartment (1960) – Billy Wilder
Ashes and Diamonds (1958) – Andrzej Wajda
The Bad Sleep Well (1960) – Akira Kurosawa
The Best Years of Our Lives (1946) – William Wyler
I Vitelloni (1953) – Federico Fellini
The King of Comedy (1983) – Martin Scorsese
Raging Bull (1980) – Martin Scorsese
Singin’ in the Rain (1951) – Stanley Donen/Gene Kelly
Sunrise (1927) – F.W. Murnau
Yojimbo (1961) – Akira Kurosawa

Greg Mottola (Superbad, Adventureland)

2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) – Stanley Kubrick
The 400 Blows (1959) – Francois Truffaut
La dolce vita (1960) – Federico Fellini
The General (1926) – Buster Keaton
The Lady from Shanghai (1947) – Orson Welles
Manhattan (1979) – Woody Allen
Modern Times (1936) – Charles Chaplin
Pather Panchali (1955) – Satyajit Ray
Persona (1966) – Ingmar Bergman
Yojimbo (1961) – Akira Kurosawa

Guillermo del Toro (Pan’s Labyrinth, Hellboy)

8˝ (1963) – Federico Fellini
La Belle et la Bete (1946) – Jean Cocteau
Frankenstein (1931) – James Whale
Freaks (1932) – Tod Browning
Goodfellas (1990) – Martin Scorsese
Greed (1925) – Erich von Stroheim
Los Olvidados (1950) – Luis Bunel
Modern Times (1936) – Charles Chaplin
Nosferatu (1922) – F.W. Murnau
Shadow of a Doubt (1943) – Alfred Hitchcock

Marc Webb (500 Days of Summer, The Amazing Spider-Man)

8˝ (1963) – Federico Fellini
Annie Hall (1977) – Woody Allen
The Bridge on the River Kwai (1957) – David Lean
Children of Men (2006) – Alfonso Cuaron
City Lights (1931) – Charles Chaplin
Dead Poets Society (1989) – Peter Weir
The Graduate (1967) – Mike Nichols
Singin’ in the Rain (1951) – Stanley Donen/Gene Kelly
Three Colours: Red (1994) – Krzysztof Kieslowski
The Year of Living Dangerously (1982) – Peter Weir

Martin Scorsese (Raging Bull, Goodfellas)

2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) – Stanley Kubrick
8˝ (1963) – Federico Fellini
Ashes and Diamonds (1958) – Andrzej Wajda
Citizen Kane (1941) – Orson Welles
The Leopard (1963) – Luchino Visconti
Paisa (1946) – Roberto Rossellini
The Red Shoes (1948) – Michael Powell/Emeric Pressburger
The River (1951) – Jean Renoir
Salvatore Giuliano (1962) – Francesco Rosi
The Searchers (1956) – John Ford
Ugetsu Monogatari (1953) – Mizoguchi Kenji
Vertigo (1958) – Alfred Hitchcock

Matthew Vaughn (Kick-Ass, X-Men: First Class)

Back to the Future (1985) – Robert Zemeckis
Being There (1979) – Hal Ashby
The Deer Hunter (1977) – Michael Cimino
The Good, The Bad, and the Ugly (1966) – Sergio Leone
Lawrence of Arabia (1962) – David Lean
Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981) – Steven Spielberg
Reservoir Dogs (1991) – Quentin Tarantino
Rocky III (1982) – Sylvester Stallone
Scarface (1983) – Brian De Palma
Star Wars (1977) – George Lucas

Quentin Tarantino (Pulp Fiction, Kill Bill)

Apocalypse Now (1976) – Francis Ford Coppola
The Bad News Bears (1976) – Michael Ritchie
Carrie (1976) – Brian De Palma
Dazed and Confused (1993) – Richard Linklater
The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly (1966) – Sergio Leone
The Great Escape (1963) – John Sturges
His Girl Friday (1939) – Howard Hawks
Jaws (1975) – Steven Spielberg
Pretty Maids All in a Row (1971) – Roger Vadium
Rolling Thunder (1997) – John Flynn
Sorcerer (1977) – William Friedkin
Taxi Driver (1976) – Martin Scorsese

Sam Mendes (American Beauty, Skyfall)

The 400 Blows (1959) – Fracois Truffaut
Blue Velvet (1986) – David Lynch
Citizen Kane (1941) – Orson Welles
Fanny and Alexander (1984) – Ingmar Bergman
The Godfather: Part II (1974) – Francis Ford Coppola
Kes (1969) – Ken Loach
Rosemary’s Baby (1968) – Roman Polanski
Taxi Driver (1976) – Martin Scorsese
There Will Be Blood (2007) – Paul Thomas Anderson
Vertigo (1958) – Alfred Hitchcock

Woody Allen (Annie Hall, Manhattan)

The 400 Blows (1959) – Francois Truffaut
8˝ (1963) – Federico Fellini
Amarcord (1972) – Federico Fellini
The Bicycle Theives (1948) – Vittorio de Sica
Citizen Kane (1941) – Orson Welles
The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie (1972) – Luis Bunel
La grand illusion (1937) – Jean Renoir
Paths of Glory (1957) – Stanley Kubrick
Rashomon (1950) – Akira Kurosawa
The Seventh Seal (1957) – Ingmar Bergman

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Neil Speaks! My Fun Skype Interview with “ParaNorman’s” Tucker Albrizzi! We Compared Fun "ParaNorman" Action Figures! 


In my review of “ParaNorman,” I said my favorite character of the film is Neil, the friend of Norman (Kodi Smit-McPhee), and the actor who voiced the role nearly stole the show! He is Mister Tucker Albrizzi who has the making of a great scene-stealer. While I interviewed the other actors face to face (Kodi Smit-McPhee, Anna Kendrick, Leslie Mann, Chris Butler, Sam Fell, Casey Affleck), I was bummed that Albrizzi was not one of the principals for the press junket.

But lo and behold, his publicist reached out to me, and we were able to Skype! I have nothing but respect for Mister Tucker, and I am sending all my good luck angels for his bright future!

So here it is. In this fun interview, we talked about:

*** His interest in making “ParaNorman”
*** How his “ParaNorman” work compare to his past voice work
*** How his character is really close to his personality.
*** Does he believe in the paranormal? He has a cute story to tell!
*** What does he want to do when he grows up?
*** We compared “ParaNorman” action figures and toys! His is much, much better!

Have fun!



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